Wellness News You Can Use
Blog Home All Blogs

Welcome to the Wellness News You Can Use Blog Archives

This site is an archive of our Well Written Blog posts until April 2020. For the most up-to-date content visit NWIJournal.com.

The opinions and thoughts expressed here those of the authors and do not necessarily correlate with those of the National Wellness Institute. Read more.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: physical  Social  Intellectual  Emotional  Nutrition  wellness  inspiration  Occupational  Spiritual  Health  diet  Exercise  Wellness In 10  Emotional wellness  Fun Facts  Quotes  Mental Health  Stress  Worksite wellness  Environment  Mindfulness  physical wellness  Depression  Weight Loss  Sleep  International Wellness  Policy  Children  Obesity  resilience 

87% of Employees Worldwide “Not Engaged”

Posted By NWI, Monday, November 7, 2016

An astonishing 87% of employees worldwide are “not engaged” with their work, resulting in low productivity for a vast array of companies that may or may not be aware of the problem. Gallup is defining “engaged” as meaning “involved in, enthusiastic about and committed to their work.

 

 

The United States does have a higher average of worker engagement than the worldwide average, but still only has a 32% engagement rate, meaning that 68% of US employees are not actively engaged in their jobs. In the 15 years that Gallup has performed this poll, the engagement rate of US employees has never topped the 33% mark.

 

Breaking this down further, 50.8% of employees polled in the US claimed that they were “not engaged,” compared to 17.2% who claimed to be “actively disengaged.” Those disengaged workers commonly rate problems with company management as reasons for their lack of engagement.

 

Why does this matter? It matters because companies who have an engaged workforce see returns on their investment 150% higher than companies with a disengaged workforce.

 

For more information about Gallup’s employee engagement polls, click here.

 

 

Tags:  Employee Health  employee wellness  Engagement  Workers  Worksite Wellness 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Be NICE. UK Health Care Group Provides Worksite Wellness Guidelines

Posted By NWI, Tuesday, February 2, 2016

The UK organization NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) has recently released an extensive list of guidelines for improving wellness in the workplace.

NICE is an organization dedicated to improving health and social care through evidence-based guidance.

NICE’s recommendations come in stark contrast to recommendations made by some other American institutions. The primary difference between the recommendations made by NICE and other organizations appears to be the overall approach to how the recommendations were formulated.

NICE’s approach is focused largely on creating a well corporate culture from the onset of the organization with an emphasis on creating an overall atmosphere of employee wellbeing. Some of the recommendations include:

 Have a proactive and visible commitment to health and safety and its role in improving the health and wellbeing of employees, that is, view health and safety as part of the culture of a caring and supportive employer – not only a statutory requirement.

and

Create a supportive environment that enables employees to be proactive when and if possible to protect and enhance their own health and wellbeing.

These types of recommendations seem to run counter to some other institutions’ approaches to workplace wellness, which seem to work to mitigate the results of a poor work environment.

With the health and wellness of employees taking a more prominent role in the corporate world, perhaps the holistic approach put forth by NICE is a good starting place for companies who are new to workplace wellness to assemble their plan.

To read all of NICE’s recommendations, click here.

Tags:  Employee Health  employee wellness  Worksite Wellness 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Report Finds Employers Measure VOI of Wellness Programs

Posted By NWI, Tuesday, November 3, 2015

The Willis Health and Productivity Survey Report 2015 was released earlier this week, and the findings about workplace wellness programs were unsurprising. Namely – employers want more for their money.

There is positivity in the report, however, with Willis referring to 2015 as a “watershed year” for worksite wellness programs.

The report states that many employers have come to grips with the idea that an immediate ROI is difficult to be achieved in a short amount of time after starting a worksite wellness program. Instead, they’re shifting their focus to VOI (Value on Investment) of different aspects of their work culture that can be achieved through a quality worksite wellness program. Aspects of work culture like presenteeism, loyalty, and tenure are being improved by providing a workplace that values wellness.

ROI is still a major concern for many employers, though, and a focus on reducing medical costs of employees still weighs heavily on many employers’ minds in terms of what they expect from a wellness program.

In terms of whether or not there is merit in having a worksite wellness program, the consensus among those polled for the Willis report seems to be a resounding “Yes.”

Tags:  Employee Health  Employee Wellness  Research  Wellness  Wellness Programs  Worksite Wellness 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)